Forest Lake Elementary School

Forest Lake Elementary School

Our Mission:

Forest Lake Elementary School is dedicated to the achievement of academic excellence and the lifelong love of learning, the enhancement of self-esteem, the building of character, respect, and responsibility through the cooperation of home, school, and community.

 

Headlines

  • AN ARBOR DAY LESSON IN PAPER RECYCLING

    In honor of Arbor Day, Wantagh students in Lori Gottlieb’s class at Forest Lake Elementary School learned how to make paper from recycled newspaper. Arbor Day in New York State is the last Friday of April and is celebrated by tree plantings and various recycling projects...

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  • WANTAGH STUDENTS MAKE VALENTINES FOR VETERANS

    Throughout Forest Lake Elementary School in Wantagh, students were busy decorating valentines and writing letters to send to veterans as part of the Town of Hempstead’s Valentines for Veterans Program...

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  • A DAY AT THE BEACH

    Inside Forest Lake Elementary School, Wantagh students traded their jackets for Hawaiian shirts and their snow boots for flip-flops as they celebrated the school’s annual Beach Day...

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  • SHARING RESEARCH ABOUT KOMODO DRAGONS

    Wantagh fourth-graders in Michele Anszelowicz’s class at Forest Lake Elementary School have been studying the Komodo dragon, a large species of lizard found in the Indonesian islands...

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  • Students Inspiring Students

    Forest Lake Student Council members offer some inspiration to their peers!

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  • A GINGERBREAD LESSON

    Students at Forest Lake have been reading gingerbread-related stories...

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  • MY AMAZING PET

    Forest Lake Elementary School student Samantha Darr was named the first-place winner in New York State Sen. Charles Fuschillo’s “Amazing Pets” photo contest...

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  • CELEBRATING NATIVE AMERICANS

    Fourth-graders at Wantagh’s Forest Lake Elementary School know how to make wampum and have tasted journey cakes, popularly known as johnnycakes, after participating in their school’s Native American Day...

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  • GOBLINS AND GHOULS JOIN FOREST LAKE STUDENTS AT THE HALLOWEEN FITNESS FUNHOUSE

    Touchdown Terror, Spider Bowl and Graveyard Golf are three of 15 physical education stations that comprise the Halloween Fitness Funhouse at Forest Lake Elementary School in the Wantagh School District. This thrilling physical education unit...

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  • A PIZZA CELEBRATION

    In celebration of National Pizza Month, first- and second-grade students at Forest Lake Elementary School in the Wantagh School District learned to make pizza with English muffins...

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  • more

Notices

Book Of The Month

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September 2014

Dear Forest Lake Community,

Now that a new school year is underway, it is once again time to begin our Book of the Month initiative.  Last year, with the help of our PTA, we were able to purchase books for every classroom each month.  The chosen books each had a specific theme or message.  These books were stories that everyone in our school read together.  We were able to talk about the same characters, the same problems, and the same authors. It helped us build a learning community of readers as well as reinforce some important character education concepts that we encourage and highlight every day within our learning community.  

 

The book that I have chosen to kick off the 2014-2015 Book of the Month program was donated by Harper Collins Publishers and is a called Chrysanthemum, by Kevin Henkes. I would like to thank Harper Collins Publishers for this generous donation to support our program.  Chrysanthemum is a cherished little mouse, believed to be absolutely wonderful in her parent’s eyes, who chose the most perfect name for her.  Until Chrysanthemum started kindergarten, she believed her parents when they said her name was perfect.  But on the first day of school, Chrysanthemum begins to suspect that her name is far less than perfect, especially when her class dissolves into giggles upon hearing her name read aloud.  That evening, Chrysanthemum’s parents try to piece her self-esteem back together again with comfort food and a night filled “with hugs, kisses, and Parcheesi.”  But the next day Victoria, a particularly observant and mean-spirited classmate, announces that Chrysanthemum’s name takes up 13 letters.  “That’s half the letters in the alphabet!” she adds.  Chrysanthemum wilts.  Pretty soon the girls are making playground threats to “pluck” Chrysanthemum and “smell her.”   One day, the students were introduced to their new music teacher, Mrs. Twinkle.  Mrs. Delphinium Twinkle.  This compassionate teacher pointed out that she too was named after a flower, and thought Chrysanthemum was a perfect name, as now did Chrysanthemum.  Will Mrs. Twinkle have what it takes to make Chrysanthemum blossom again? 

 

When we send our little mice into the world, they too often encounter such negative experiences.  Often our first impulse is to banish the bully and restore our child’s happiness.  Some parents arm themselves and leap into battle, enlisting other children’s parents or teachers to fix the problem.  In doing so, they make the problem their own.  The difficulty with this approach is that it doesn’t give our children the experience and confidence they will need as they encounter the negatives that are inevitable in their journey ahead.  They continue to believe that someone else will be needed to right the wrongs. How much better the approach of Chrysanthemum’s parents, who spent their time and energy restoring her sense of self, strengthening her for the fray when she went out again.  A child with a strong sense of self is well equipped to stand up for herself.  Each experience she then has adds to her image of herself as capable of handling whatever comes up on her own.  Chrysanthemum’s parents also helped her to understand the feelings that were the likely motivation for the kids who acted mean. 

 

Thus equipped, with both understanding and a strong sense of self, all our little mice will be well-fitted to handle the matter on their own.  What a great lesson to teach!  When your child’s days are less than perfect, read Chrysanthemum, and remind both of you where true strength lies.   

 

Happy Reading!

 

Anthony F. Ciuffo, Jr.

 

Anthony F. Ciuffo, Jr.

Principal

Forest Lake School